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Landscape practice

I've been struggling to capture a good landscape photo.  My problem is that i really don't know what to focus on. 

Many landscape photos have minimal human activity while others are influenced by human existence.  As with most art forms perception is broad and may include urban settings, industrial areas and nature photography.

  • Have a wide depth of field
  • Golden hour is a great time of day to shoot
  • Have the horizon on the top or bottom 1/3
Below are some examples of the landscape photos i have taken:

f/13, 1/250, ISO 100
I used the tree and the grass to frame the photo, i also used a high f/stop.  This photo was taken in the middle of the afternoon, the sky was beautiful.  I adjusted the exposure and contrast to add more emphasis on the sky and produce a rich blue.

f/8. 1/3200, ISO 100
This photo was a bit of a fail out of the three tips, i only executed one correctly - shooting in golden hour.  What i was trying to capture was the sunlight sitting on the ship and also the light on the water.  I was thinking that the light on the water would be a leading line toward the ship.  I was also thinking of fore, mid and background at this point.  The water in the fore ground with the light on it, the ship in the mid ground and the hills and sky as the background.  I was also thinking of the contrasting colours in the sky which was also mirrored in the water - the warmth from the sunlight grey brown against the blue of the sky and water.



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